Sunday, 12 July 2020

Kids Digging Up Barnsley



Barnsley Museums announce that for the Festival of Archaeology:
we’re encouraging young archaeologists to have their own small dig at home! This film has tips to get you started: share your finds with us all week using #BarnsleyDigs Get digging! 
The question is, is this teaching archaeology or artefact hunting? A hole is dug, old objects are found and fitted to a past illustrating the documents. No mention of interpreting the soil layers encountered in the holes. But an object -centred view of the past is what one can expect from the museums. Thank goodness we have a PAS to do some real archaeological outreach, oh, wait.... er....

Money Spent on Recording Metal Detecting Finds "Some of the Best Spent in UK Archaeology"?


Don O'Meara @don_o_meara 2:35 PM · 11 cze 2020
[...] Personally I think the budget of @findsorguk is some of the best spent in UK archaeology
Some do, others don't. But those that do can - even if employed in public outreach - rarely explain in more detail, at least without reference to some debased form of Kossinnism, but whatever finds-focused islanders think, Kossinna is by now so passé on the continent.


Saturday, 11 July 2020

Mary and Jesus Detecting, Piously Roman


eBay seller craig20050 (14583) has quite a few metal detected finds for sale, 113 to be precise. Some are displayed on the pages of finds catalogues with prices in them - such catalogues would be good to make available to farmers looking over the finds made by metal detectorists on their land, before they say, "yeah, take the lot for a fiver". A rather thought-provoking find is this  Un Researched Roman Bronze coin Empress ? Mary and Jesus detecting (its a Theodora Pietas Romana, 337-340 AD).   PAS tells us that their proteges are all passionately interested in history, and not in the money at all. yet it is so easy just a mouse click or two away to find so many blokes like this that go out remove stuff from sites, don't even bother to look them up properly, and just flog them off. That's not a passion for history, there is no intellectual curiosity (or capacity) revealed here for actually learning about history, just a bloke out to make some money. If these are his own finds, does a man living in Pontefract, Yorkshire have a permit for searching the Thames foreshore in London with a metal detector?


"Name Found on Inscribed Ingot!"



Welsh pig

ChesterArchSoc @ChesterArchSoc · 6 g.
Ingot found near Wrexham. 'If researchers are able to confirm that Marcus Trebellius Maximus’ name is indeed inscribed on the lead bar, then it will be the sole relic bearing his name ever unearthed in the United Kingdom, reports the Star.'
Sooooo? They found a name, a name that matches the name that was in the documents, and .....?




Archaeologist: "A Pragmatic Approach to Artefact Hunting Works and has Benefited the Heritage of the Country Greatly


It's bucketing down in Warsaw at the moment so the forest walk is less inviting, but am having an interesting discussion with one of the few FLOs that has confidence in their ability to actually talk to concerned individuals like me. It started when he used the R word ("responsible artefact hunting" - for me that is an oxymoron) but Twitter is not a good place to continue any kind of a discussion. So here's an experiment. At one stage Peter Reavill (on his personal account) said:
Peter Reavill @PeterReavill ·8 min
These are my personal views Paul and I do not speak for the scheme as a whole. I do know that a pragmatic approach works and has benefited the heritage of the country greatly. [...] 
The 'pragmatic approach' (a phrase coined by Roger Bland)  means 'letting artefact hunters get on with it, as long as they show us some of what they find'. Twitter is no place to answer the question that comes to my mind properly, so I invite Mr Reavill to think about what he means and reply in a comment here. I think Mr Reavill has after his 17 years FLOing a fair idea of how to phrase his own personal answer to that question, as an archaeologist like myself.
"has benefited the heritage of the country greatly" [Leaving aside 'country'], serious question, can you (personally) as an archaeologist define 'benefit', 'heritage' and 'greatly' relative to the archaeological record, and not in the language of collectors or loose artefacts?
Will he? FLOs like to pretend they do not read this blog. I will leave aside the question of "heritage of the country" because I believe (as I must  as the author of a blog on the implications of the global antiquities trade) that heritage is not just a national(ist) issue, but I'd like to hear what the FLO-archaeologist has to say about just what metal detectorists contribute to archaeology.

[Rather insultingly], Mr Reavill requested:
"The caveat is that you use this response in the way it is intended rather than to fuel your agenda"
Hmmm. My agenda here is getting the issues talked about openly, and I invite him as a guest writer to share his views with readers of this ('biased' he says) blog. I suspect he's afraid I might say I disagree with him. OK, the deal is this, I will only comment on the things in his reply that I agree with. OK? Less scary?

Mr Reavill, if you answer, since we are talking about European archaeology in the 2020s, in fairness I will warn you that I do not like dot-distribution maps and culture-historical atavism. Also this is not about tekkies merely following the Treasure Act, I am more interested in this PAS thing that is there "to advance knowledge of the history and archaeology of England and Wales by systematically recording archaeological objects found by the public [and] to raise awareness among the public of the educational value of archaeological finds in their context and facilitate research in them". What can you tell me about that in the context of the question posed above? 

Friday, 10 July 2020

Iranian Antiquities Smuggled to Austria Returned


Teheran Times, 'Ancient relics smuggled to Austria back home' July 10, 2020.

A batch of Iranian ancient relics that had been smuggled to Austria, was found in a safety-deposit box of a bank in Austria in April last year. The bank set about renovating the building which meant emptying the safe-deposit boxes inside the bank. They notified the holders of the safe-deposit boxes that the bank, but in the cases when nobody came forward they were opened by the bank. It was then that it was discovered that one of the holders kept some antiquities of gold and silver in his/her box. Note the terminology:
“The images [that we have been received from the confiscated objects] show a metal rhyton in the Achaemenid style, which its counterparts are found in the National Museum of Iran and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; and a bronze headpiece of the Sassanid King (Shapur II), the original of which is made of silver being kept at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York….,” he explained. 
The objects were handed over to a representative of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Vienna on Thursday. 

Two things. Iran is one of those areas of antiquities collecting where there are enormous numbers of  fakes and misattributed artefacts on the market (particularly 'Luristan'). We can't see these objects up close, but from a distance the patina across a large part of the batch is pretty uniform. The rhyton is said to be "in Achaemenid style" and the bronze [bust] of which the original is in the Met. suggests that the recipients know that many of the items in the batch are fake .

Secondly, we are starting to learn that in the antiquities grey market, after smuggling, artefacts are frequently stockpiled hidden away (often eight to ten years - or more) to |"surface" when the paper trail is more likely to have grown cold. In this case, it seems that the dealer had died and was unable to retrieve the hidden artefacts in the time allowed. How many more such caches are there in European bank vaults?

Commercial Metal Detecting Rallies Get the Boris go-Ahead


Now that Britain has created an effective mobile phone tracking system as advanced as the ones developed in the EU to safeguard the public, the NCMD has just published this:
Covid 19 Update 9th July 2020
Larger digs are now allowed in England Digs for up to 30 people were permitted from the 4th July. Today the DCMS have confirmed that businesses and charitable trusts (amongst others) may run events for more than 30 people. [...] However please note that this still means that anyone running digs who are not a registered business may still restricted by law to 30 people (including support staff). We will seek legal advice for club events and issue guidance when we have it. However please note we do not represent commercial dig organisers and they should seek their own legal counsel if they are unsure of the law. We strongly urge every event organiser to comply fully with these rules and procedures. New regulations allow for on the spot fines and/ or prosecution if they are found to be in breach of the regulations. [...] Finally, we urge you to please protect our hobby’s reputation and be responsible in organising events, and avoid attending illegal digs at this time
 So, instead of uselessly patrolling in fluorescent yellow-painted cars in order to catch the chronically colour-blind nighthawk in action, police rural crime units can visit rallies and award spot fines to any irresponsible behaviour noted. Dodgy rallies should be easier to find than nighthawks, bigger. Note the NCMD suggesting avoiding illegal metal detecting "at this time"




Thursday, 9 July 2020

Ooo, "How Lucky we Are!"


Prof Carenza Lewis @CarenzaLewis · 11 g.
The Portable Antiquities Scheme has recorded 1.5 MILLION finds - an amazing achievement - just think how much knowledge about the past is now available for us all in those 1,500,000 objects. Well done, every single person involved. The UK is lucky to have @findsorguk https://twitter.com/findsorguk/status/1281000359876538378
How lucky? The population of England and Wales is 56 million - that means that over the period of 23+ years (at a net cost of millions of pounds), only one in 33 members of the public has ever shown anything to the Scheme. How deeply has its message of 'Best Practice' in fact penetrated British society?

The people who are "lucky" are the fifty or so archaeologists that the PAS has secured employment for down the years.

In any case, how much "knowledge about the past" is actually contained in a heap of loose objects on something called a database, and how does one define "knowledge about the past"? Ebay's millions of loose British portable antiquities also provide "knowledge" about old things too, don't they? And that showcase of antiquities costs the public nothing. 

What detailed use has Prof Lewis been making of the information about finds made by the members of the public in their gardens and fields around their houses in her ongoing work on  Currently Occupied Rural Settlements in Eastern England? As far as I can see, she has not been making extensive use of this material in her community archaeology projects - and if these 'data' cannot be used in this kind of research (think about it a minute), then what use are they?

When the PAS is scrapped to save money (post-Covid and post-Brexit), it will be seen how deeply the lessons it was created to teach finders about an ill-defined 'best practice' have in fact sunk in. Then we will assess how "lucky" it was that Britain elected to deal with collection-driven exploitation of the archaeological record in the way it did 1997-2020, and how much of a "success" that was, seen in the long-term perspective.



"A lovely find": It's got pictures and writing on it - and wottalott've them we got! [UPDATED]


"A piece of history in your hand"
 versus archaeological evidence
Hooray, hooray..
Dr John Naylor @DrJohnNaylor
This is an amazing achievement, 1.5 million finds recorded by @findsorguk. A lovely find for the milestone too, a 13th-century #medieval papal bulla which acted as a seal of authenticity on papal documents. This one from #Shropshire is for Pope Innocent IV. https://twitter.com/findsorguk/status/1281000359876538378
But that is "1,500,005 objects within 959,943 records", but where are the missing 6,755,161 records since the start of the Portable Antiquities Scheme? In the light of this, in what way is this an "amazing achievement" when it seems nearly seven million recordable artefacts have been simply pocketed without a trace since the beginning of the PAS? Is that not, instead "shocking"?

Update 9th July 2020

@rickwills40
Metal detectorist, unconcerned about the scale of destruction caused by collection-driven exploitation of the archaeological record.
richard wills@rickwills40 W odpowiedzi do @PortantIssues
It's absolutely marvellous , well done Pas . A real figure from actual facts . Can't say anything about the " missing " made up number .
The actual facts are that despite 23 years' "liaison" with artefact hunters, PAS is in no position to provide any fact-based estimate of their own to challenge ours. In that case, ours is the best available until they do.

The fact also is that Mr Wills uses as his Twitter avatar photos of the obverse and reverse of the same snapped hammered coin metal detector find, yet refuses to admit whether or not it has been recorded by the PAS. There are many artefact hunters in Britain that are content to cash in on the legitimation that the PAS (and its "responsible metal detectorists") provides for their exploitative hobby, but in fact themselves do not produce more than a handful, if that, of their own collection for recording.


Tuesday, 7 July 2020

Piecing Together the History of "The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection" from Dealers' "Documentation": Summary (As Things Stand Today)


Howard Rose
The several dozen posts below this consider antiquities being sold in the US, Netherlands and the UK that are mostly provenanced to the collection of an Egyptian national Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, who in 1948 moved to the US. In or around 2013, his grandson started selling this material. It is possible that the sales started earlier, but they are more difficult to trace online and I have not had time to do this yet. I do not believe the Spanish dealer's claim that the sales started in the early 60s (before the birth of the current seller). This is an undocumented claim and I think totally invented.

The first sale that I have located at the moment (possibly there are earlier sales in New York, perhaps Arte Primitivo?) is the sale in London at Bonham's of four fragments of relief from an unlocated monument of Smenty Wahibrenebahet in May 2013. What is interesting is the provenance: 
Ashraf Eldarir Collection, USA, acquired by the present owner's grandfather Mr. Souaya in Egypt in 1948, thence by descent. Ashraf Eldarir's grandfather was a friend of Prince of Egypt Omar Tosson, with whom he shared a passion for archaeology. The collection was formed during the 1930s-1940s, mostly gifts from Prince Tosson. The collection was moved to the United States in 1948 and remained in their possession until the present day.
Ashraf is Ashraf Omar (public records in the US that can be found online show that he seems to have used a number of names and lived in a number of places in central Brooklyn over the past 20 years), but the grandfather's name is given in a different form in the documentation of later sales. The 'brought to the US in 1948' theme is maintained throughout.It would be very interesting to know who put this material on sale.

In 2014 there was a sale of another sculpture, a Third Intermediate Period stele sold by Ancient Resource Auctions Glendale, California. I have not yet traced any New York sales from 2013-4. In 2015, however, there was the first (?) New York sale of Eldarir material, just across the river in Manhattan by Arte Primitivo Howard S. Rose Gallery (Auction 75, May 18th, 2015). Admittedly the seller's name is not given, nor the name of the collector, but the theme "Private NYC collection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by descent" as well as the range of material represented suggest very strongly what this is. It is interesting to speculate why the name is not given at this stage. :

In 2016 Charles Ede in London had a sculpted Old Kingdom piece which is sold with a variant of the Prince Tosson story (but this time with a new surname of the old collector) and with the name of the dealer " Mr Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, Egypt; acquired 17th June 1941 from Salahaddin Sirmali". So far, I have only found these names in relation to these sales. It looks like Ede was shown a copy of a document of the same format as the one the map-seller received. Some time after 2015 (there is no date on the sale), Alexander Ancient Art (Alexander Biesbroek, Voorschoten The Netherlands) resold a relief fragment from the Ezeldeen Taha Eldaric collection that had come from the 2015 Arte Primitivo sale, but cites the Tosson story. He thinks it came from the same tomb as the Bonham's fragment.

In March 2017 Howard S. Rose in his New York Arte Primitivo Gallery (Catalogue 84) has only a few small items from the "exported to the USA in 1948" collection, amulets and jewellery and two shabtis, but also a wooden figure explicitly said to be from the Elzadeen Taha Eldarir collection. The latter turned up three years later in a sale by Christoph Bacher Archäologie Ancient Art Gallery in Vienna, apparently bought directly from the Arte Primitivo site, along with a number of amulets obtained perhaps by the splitting of lots.

Possibly I have missed some sales of this material from 2018 (?). Washington DC dealer Sue McGovern Huffman (convener of the Association of Dealers and Collectors of Ancient and Ethnographic Art) had a sawn-up bit of coffin on sale in 2018 and 2019. This had been sawn off a mummy case at chest level for transport. Again we see a return to the Tosson theme and teh grandfather's alternative name:
Ashraf Eldarir Collection, New York, USA, acquired by the present owner's grandfather Mr. Souaya in Egypt in 1948, thence by descent. Ashraf Eldarir's grandfather was a friend of Prince of Egypt Omar Tosson, with whom he shared a passion for archaeology. The collection was formed during the 1930s-1940s, mostly gifts from Prince Tosson [...].
The number of sales of material from this old collection picks up in 2019. Most of this was going through the Arte Primitivo Gallery on East 65th Street New York, with the September 16th 2019 sale (jewellery, an odd-looking plastered and painted mudbrick, amulets, wrenched-off 'mummy masks', lots of jelly-baby shabtis, mummy beads - some staged as found in a jar - some dodgy looking figurienes and a relief fragment). By now the provenance has developed to the form: "Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house", though this is not used consistently. But that sale of 15th May 1930 must have been a big one as it is mentioned a number of times subsequently. One of them was the 'jar of jelly-baby shabtis' sold separately by Arte Primitivo in December 2019.

On April 18th 2019 it is reported that Omar Eldarir was stopped with a single artefact (polychrome relief) from Egypt.in his hand luggage but apparently no paperwork for it.

Things start happening in earnest in 2020. On January 22nd 2020 Omar Eldarir arrived at JFK from Egypt with three 'dirty' suitcases, when Customs inspected them they were found to contain 590 bubble and foam-wrapped Egyptian antiquities. Eldarir did not produce any of the required documentation from Egypt authorizing the export of the artefacts.

A few months later, the Chicago coin dealer Harlan Berk sold a wooden shabti, allegedly from the old Eldarir collection in April 2020. It is a pretty naff piece and the patina is a bit odd. It's not clear how he obtained it. It was also one of the latest pieces acquired by the collector:
Ex collection of Mr Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir; acquired 1946 from Salahaddin Sirmali, Cairo. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house.
Also in April 2020, Arte Primitivo has an 'Isis-Aphrodite' figurine and quotes a sales document:
"It is on August 6th, 1929. We the honorable Salahaddin Sirmali...bey sold to the honorable Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir ...bey A group of ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities. Authenticated and appraised by the ancient Egyptian expert and the head of the Egyptian antiquities house: Mr. Hossen Rashed [...]".
The document itself is not shown, and neither is the buyer informed that they will receive a copy.It is interesting that the same combination of individuals is involved, even though the activities were 17 years apart.

In June this year Bob Dodge of Artemis Gallery Erie, Colorado USA has been selling several items of the Eldarir grandfather collection that had previously been bought (when? How?) by a Honolulu collector
Provenance: private Hawaii, USA collection; ex-private Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir collection, New York, USA, purchased in December, 1946 and imported from Egypt in November, 1948; ex-Salahaddin Sirmali collection, Egypt; appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian antiquities house
Papyri that the same Honolulu collector had with the same provenence were bought in 1929. I feel if we knew more about that Hawaiian collection, we might have more of an idea about the beginnings of the dispersal of Mr Eldarir's material.

Another New York dealer (Howard Knowes, "Art for eternity" ) has a May 15th 1930 piece. A wrenched-off mummy case face. Nasty. I strongly suspect that a Spanish seller has just copied the provenance of something he's seen online and falsely claimed it for one of his over-priced fakes.

One of the more informative sales of this material is not by an antiquities dealer at all. It seems map-sellers are not aware that antiquities dealers tend to 'lose' any documentation - can't let the punter see some, or they'll all want some. Anyay a map seller in  Jefferson City, Tennessee found himself teh possessor of an 'Ancient Egyptian Polychrome Wall Painting New Kingdom, 19th-20th Dynasty', bought as lot 485 of the Arte Primitivo sale September 18th, 2019 (where it had an estimate of $25,000-$35,000). Anyway the new owner does not really want it and is trying to flog it off. One might surmise why, and why they ar willing to shift it at a price lower than the (admittedly over-inflated) estimate. As a buttress for the claim that this piece is perfectly legitimate, they've actually attached  what is supposed to be a sales document of April 24th 1929. Really worth a look, you'll not see many of those on eBay!

Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir was a collector that knew what he likes, and he liked a lot of it, he did not want a few mummy beads, he wanted and acquired heaps of them, jelly-bean shabtis he collected by the bucketful, amulets by the boxfull. He was not interested in the whole mummy cases, just the faces ripped off them, or even the bronze framed inlaid eyes gouged from them.  No wonder his heirs wanted to get rid of such monotonously repetitive material. Fortunately for his heirs, these big job lots are just what dealers love to split up and sell off singly, more profit there. So granddad's hoarding habit provided a nice little windfall. But why, pray, if he had these masses of stuff holed up in one of his Brooklyn properties to get rid of to make some space, did Mr Eldarir decide to go to Egypt to bring more stuff over? To fill the empty cupboards as a memorial to the old man? Once he was stopped, it seems he was risking a lot by doing it a second time. Why? Hopefully the upcoming court case will resolve the mystery.

All individuals mentioned in this post are, as ever, innocent unless proven guilty.

"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Nearly six hundred Egyptian 'Antiquities' Seized in New York (January - July 2020)


The Department of Justice press release names a man alleged to be an antiquities smuggler ('Brooklyn Man Indicted on Cultural Artifacts Smuggling Charges' DOJ Press release Monday, July 6, 2020)
An indictment has been returned in federal court in Central Islip, New York charging Ashraf Omar Eldarir, a U.S. citizen, with smuggling Egyptian cultural property into the United States. Eldarir was previously arrested on a complaint in February 2020 after arriving at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) with three suitcases filled with undeclared Egyptian antiquities. [...] on January 22, 2020, Eldarir arrived at JFK from Egypt with three checked suitcases. Eldarir falsely declared to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that he was carrying goods valued at only 300 U.S. dollars. However, when CBP officers opened Eldarir’s suitcases they found 590 bubble and foam-wrapped Egyptian antiquities. When the protective wrapping was opened, loose sand and dirt spilled out, and some of the items smelled of wet earth, indicators that the artifacts had been recently excavated.  [...]  Eldarir did not produce any of the required documentation from Egypt authorizing the export of the artifacts. Eldarir was charged with one count of smuggling arising from this incident, and one count of smuggling involving an earlier trip in which he smuggled an ancient Egyptian polychrome relief. [...] “These cultural treasures traveled across centuries and millennia, only to end up unceremoniously stuffed in a dirt-caked suitcase at JFK,” stated United States Attorney Donoghue. [...] The charges in the indictment are allegations, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty. If convicted, Eldarir faces a maximum sentence of 20 years’ imprisonment on each count. 

The seized artefacts 
The damp earth smell could also have been caused by the objects being recently removed from a damp underground storage space. Note the verbal association between the carrier and 'dirt'. There were a variety of objects, typical of the sort of thing collectors seek to add to their collections:
Among the items recovered by law enforcement officers are gold amulets from a funerary set; a relief with the cartouche of a Ptolemaic king that was originally part of a royal building or temple; wooden tomb model figures with linen garments dating to approximately 1900 BCE; and two complete Roman period funerary stelae of the type found at Kom abu Bellou in Egypt.
The indictment contains a fuller list of the objects:
(a) forty-one ( 41) ancient Egyptian gold artifacts;
(b) nineteen ( 19) ancient coins;
(c) two (2) Greco-Roman rings;
(d) thirty-one (31) ancient Egyptian talismans (Ptolemaic period);
(e) fourteen (14) ancient beads;
(f) twenty-six (26) ancient Egyptian wooden figures;
(g) four hundred (400) ancient Egyptian faience shabtis; (h) three (3) ancient Egyptian wooden panels with painted figures;
(i) one (I) ancient Egyptian large stone face;
(j) two (2) Egyptian wooden masks;
(k) two (2) Egyptian stone panels with hieroglyphics;
(1) three (3) ancient Egyptian canopic jar lids;
(m) two (2) ancient Greco-Roman stela;
(n) one (1) ancient Greco-Roman terracotta headless torso with robes;
(o) seven (7) ancient Greco-Roman terracotta statues;
(p) three (3) ancient Egyptian large terracotta vases;
(q) two (2) Egyptian small terracotta vases;
(r) two (2) Egyptian alabaster artifacts;
(s) two (2) ancient Egyptian Osiris headpieces/crowns;
(t) twenty-six (26) ancient Greco-Roman oil lamps; and
(u) one (1) Greco-Roman terracotta pilgrim's flask,
The gold objects (a) and coins (b) are on the white paper in the middle. I can't distinguish the Graeco-Roman rings (c). Twenty three (?) of the amulets ('talismans') (d) are on the white paper sheets in the middle (I don't know why the are all said to be "Ptolemaic"), some of them seem quite big for the type. There are four 'sons of Horus' just above the HS logo. The beads (e) are also on the sheets of paper. There are 21 wooden figures (f) seen, most shabtis, at least one 'concubine figure'/doll, three tomb models, one looking a bit dubious in this photo. Likewise the standing figure on a pedestal at the back looks a bit odd, the face might be a modern modification (?), it is probably a knackered Ptah-Sokar-Osiris figure (and the ostrich plume crown in the foreground possibly belongs to it). I did not count the faience shabtis (g), one group of 'jelly baby' miniatures all over the right hand side are Third Intermediate Period or later and may be mostly from the same tomb - to the left are some slightly bigger and better made shabtis (XIX dyn and later). The 'panels' (k) are actually heavily damaged (recently sawn-up) yellow-painted sarcophagus sides. The 'ancient egyptian large stone face' (i), top centre, looks a bit odd to me. Two 'masks' (j) are the wrenched off faces from mummy-cases (not the same as h). Those two stone panels (k) are presumably the ones next to the three canopic jar lids, cant say much about them from this photo. The canopic jar lids are all stained in a similar way, and might be thought to possibly have come from the same deposit (where's the fourth?) but all three represent Imsety... the two Graeco-Roman stele (m top right) both have freshly-sawn edges). The terracotta figure (n) is next to the sarcophagus bits, five of the other seven (o) are in the bottom left corner. They look a bit nasty, and some may be fakes (one of the ones at the back is a bit out of focus but looks more pre-columbian than anything else - but that's not really my field). I must admit to having a soft spot for black-top Naqada ceramics, dismissively referred to as 'large terracotta vases' here (p) and the third is also probably pre-dynastic too. I can only see one of the alabaster vessels (r), next to the pots. Likewise there seems to be only one horned ostrich-plume crown (it's not an Atef crown) fragment (s) on display. There are 26 lamps on show, but whether or not they are all real or 'Graeco-Roman' (or even from this region), I'll leave others to decide. The flask (u) is presumably the brown cylinder in the front on the left of the photo.

So its all a bit of a mix, material from at least one (Third Intermediate period??) tomb seems to be present, stuff looted from pre-dynastic cemeteries in Middle Egypt, and Hellenistic period sites as well. I suspect though that (as always) some fakes are mixed in too.

One wonders why Eldarir was stopped. It seems this was not the first time, in April last year he'd been stopped and searched and they found an ancient artefact. I guess he did not realise that antiquities dealers are on a watch list in the US. Another clue was the phrase 'dirty suitcases' used by a customs officer. There is also the mention of "loose sand and dirt" spilling out, and "some of the items smelled of wet earth". Was a sniffer dog trained to find antiquities used to check a passenger carrying three unusually dirty suitcases? Looking at this material, I wonder how much room would be left in an average suitcase after this material was crammed into it in bubble wrap. Possibly not a lot. Not enough for clothes for a long stay. Could it be that Eldarir was merely a courier and carrying suitcases packed in advance by a dealer in Egypt (that the suitcases were Egyptian rather than American)?



"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Item Resold by a Map Dealer (July 2020)


Material from the Eldarin grandfather collection is even turning up on eBay. Seller tassbunch2 (201 ) Robert Tassone ('Maps of Points Renowned' - specialists in antiquarian maps from the 15th through the 20th centuries), Jefferson City, Tennessee, United States has this Ancient Egyptian Polychrome Wall Painting New Kingdom, 19th-20th Dynasty (“Over 3,000 years old -1295-1069 B.C. Amazing Subject Matter !”), Price:US $15,000.00 Buy It Now Shipping:$186.15 USPS Priority Mail International
Ancient Egyptian Polychrome Wall Painting, New Kingdom, 19th-20th dynasty, ca. 1295-1069 B.C. Size: 18 1/4 inches x 15 1/4 inches. (46.35 x 38.73) + mount. Large stele section of a painted wall fragment. Depicting Standing female figure wearing an ankle length garment with broad collar, stands in front of an altar, her right hand raised. The front panel of the altar is painted with a rearing snake. Above are four crown symbols. Restored from two pieces. Custom metal mount. Provenance:Private NYC collection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by sale.
Now, this is quite interesting for this is lot 485 from the Arte Primitivo ( Howard S. Rose Gallery, Inc.) Fine Pre-Columbian, Tribal Art and Classical Antiquities sale September 18th, 2019 (where it had an estimate of $25,000-$35,000). What however is even more interesting is the next part of the description:

A copy of the pictured letter of authentication is included and is here translated:
It is on the twenty fourth day of April, the year nineteen hundred and twenty nine, 1929 AD.
We the honorable/ Salahaddin Sirmali....Bey  Sold to The honorable/ Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir...Bey A group of ancient Egyptian antiquities. Authenticated and appraised by the ancient Egyptian expert and the head of the Egyptian antiquities house: Mr, Hossen Rashed. For the amount of three thousand Egyptian pound only. Their description as follow: 
- Ptolemaic limestone head for a king wearing the striated royal nemesis fronted by the cobra. It measures 23 cm high.
- Egyptian limestone head for a man with remaining of painting, the back of head are missing. Roman period measuring 14 cm long.
- The upper part of wooden sarcophagus lid of a lady wearing the long winged Egyptian wig, with extended winged Scarbe painted on her chest. The decorated hand are crossed on her chest. Third intermediate period measuring 80 cm long.
- A Greek white marble head of a Ptolemaic king measuring 11 cm long.
- Twenty pieces of tangra art figure, from ptolemaic period. Few are painted and the rest aren’t, different size and shape.
- five wood panels from sarcophagus with a sunk relief of hieroglyphics inscription, different size and shape.
- Four limestone sunk relief, the first one has a cartouche of Ptolemy V, measuring 24 cm wide. The second with hieroglyphics inscription measuring 31 cm wide. The third one has hieroglyphics inscription measuring 22 cm wide. The fourth sunk relief has an image of the falcon hours extending his wings with a cartouche of Ptolemy V behind it.
- Two polychrome painted wall relief over guess. The first with a figure of standing falcon hours measuring 31 cm long. The second with an image of a standing women raising both hand, behind him is a shrine with a figure of a cobra. inside on top of the shrine are four fathers, two on each side measuring 46 cm high and 39 cm wide.
- Twenty papyrus scroll of different size with hieroglyphics inscription.
The seller/Salahaddin Sirmali....Bey
The buyer/Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir...Bey
The Expert and appraisal Mr/ Hossen Rashed.
First of all 'the pictured letter of authentication' probably means that the buyer obtained a coloured copy (xerox, photo?) of the original manuscript. This is confirmed by looking at the photo published in teh auction (one of very few eBay auctions in which such documentation is shown). This of course means that the buyer cannot verify the autjhenticity of the document, for example by examining the paper (watermarks etc).

Now, the names mentioned are of course the names associated with other sales of material from the Eldarir grandfather collection:
1) The seller: Salahaddin Sirmali. He is mentioned on the internet - apparently only - in relationship to the sales of items to a single buyer - the owner of the Eldarir collection. Is he known elsewhere?

2) The grandfather: Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir is also mentioned on the internet only in relationship to the sales of items from a single seller. Is he known elsewhere?  Presumably he left Egypt with the end of the British Mandate for Palestine and the beginning of the Arab-Israeli War.

3)The authenticator: Hossen Rashed again is a name that appears in an internet search related to antiquities only in the context of the items from the Eldarir collection. Is he known from anywhere else?

If we take a look at the letter, we see that in the top right corner it has a 15 millemes postal stamp stuck on. The stamp is of a series current in 1929, but why is it there? Such a stamp might mean that a court or notary fee had been paid, but the document is in no way endorsed by a court or notary, the stamp is not cancelled - and it is a normal postage stamp rather than any official label. Perhaps somebody who knows about contractual processes in 1920s Egypt might enlighten us what this means.

Does the letter suggest that Salahaddin Sirmali worked in the same ' Egyptian antiquities house' as Hossen Rashed? Where was this? What actually was the purpose of this document in 1929? It is far more detailed than any receipt need be.

"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Hiding the Dead Grandfather's Eyes (2019)


In her own two-day trawl through the material sold in recent years that was claimed to be from Omar Eldarir's grandtathers collection, Lynda Albertson found a couple I had missed or not paid attention to.

I missed the significance of the sale of a "pair of Ancient Egyptian Bronze Eyes" through Trocadero via Mark Goodstein at Explorer Ancient Art  Staten Island, NY 10306. It is a shame because I did not get a screenshot in time. The link is now disabled, it seems Mark Goodstein (Explorer Ancient Art) is not so keen to stand by the original statement that this was from a specific old collection. Why? I assume he saw documentation and checked it before he put them in his stock, so what's the problem? These eyes are the same as figured (lot 498) in an Arte Primitivo sale of 16 September 2019, just down the road in New York.


Hat tip: Lynda Albertson, thanks for screenshot



"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection" : One Turns up in Spain (July 2020)


Top, star-in-a-jar, bottom, seller's other items
eBay Seller coleccionrelojes (157) from Ocaña, Spain, has a rather inflated idea of how much a piece of painte plaster from the Eldarir collection might be worth, he or she wants 9.500,00 EUR for this Ancient Egyptian Sandstone Polychromed fragment with a "Seba" or egyptian star.
Extremly rare piece from ancient Egypt. Important Egyptian archeology piece.
Beautifull and brightness fragment of polychromed stone showing a "Seba" or Egyptian Star from a ceilling. Originally found in Rameses II temple area, at Abydos in 1930-35. probably from an Egyptian tomb mummy.
Ca. 2050 - 1750 B. C.
A very impressive and extremely rare archeological beautiful millenary piece.
Certificate Of Authenticity (COA), Object Identification (Object ID) document, Provenence Statement and Independent Ancient Art Expert Appraisal Valuation Document will be provided to the buyer.
Originally purchased to Salahaddin Refik Sirmali in Cairo in 1940, Ex Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir collection.
From 1960-61 in a private collection on Spain till now.
Previous property history, collected from 1960-61.
Expert Appraisal Valuation Dossier is included by an independent ancient art expert.
Pre-1970 UNESCO convention.
Export license IS necessary within the European Union and United Kingdom.
Due to its value and age, is necessary by law an export permit. Seller will arrange all needed permits and paperwork to export from Spain. Exports tax Fees (7%) to add final price. It only may be placed to spanish authorities once sold as buyer details would be needed.
Sadly, I think this provenance is made up, this seller is flogging off two other Egyptian 'antiquities', a fake Sekhmet head with clear signs of angle-grinder work, and a particularly horrible fake mummy mask. These are shown in photos into which other 'egyptian antiquities' can be made out in the background to give the impression that this is an experienced collector/dealer.  I do not think the sandstone looks very convincing either, and would suggest the seller has no documentation to show that this was anywhere near the Eldarir collection, from which it was allegedly sold in the 1960s.

"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Howard Knowes and a White Faced Mummy Case Fragment (2020)



And here's another dealer helping Mr Eldari get rid of his old grandfather's collection:  Howard Nowes Ancient Art ("Art for eternity", East 81st Street, New York, NY 10028):
13667. Egyptian Wood Painted Sarcophagus Mask Late Period, Circa 712 to 300 BC
A carved hardwood mummy masks (sic), painted with a white ground; a partial high crown with a painted red-brown central sun disc, with traces of ocher, red-brown and blue pigment highlights and details, black outlined eyes and brows. Ancient losses to both sides of crown and a few minor imperfections. Size: 11 inches H. + custom mount.
Provenance: Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930.
Original Price: $3,450  Special Price: $2,995
All items are guaranteed authentic as described.
This one is quite an interesting study piece, it shows what a mummy case looks like after grave robbers have wrenched the face off to sell, where are the ancient human remains, were they treated with more respect than the ancient coffin?


"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": United by Cahn at TEFAF (7th March 2020)


Then at TEFAF 2020 two of these pieces are reunited. I'll use here a screenshot from Lynda Albertson's blog:


The Christie's sales (as well as on Lynda's blog) are mentioned here and here. The ptolemaic head can still be found on Google cache and does not look so bad from the side.   

Note the odd alteration of the name that the "American collector" will have given Mr Cahn, but it seems he thinks he knows better than the grandson how the old man's name "should have been" spelt, or perhaps he's got an idea that it might be best not to link these two items with the others... for some reason. A possibility reinforced by the disappearance of the evidence from the dealers' website. 

Hat tip, Lynda Albertson


"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Artemis Gallery, A Whole Mummy Case, a 'mask', Rolls of Papyri (June 4th 2020)


Bab Darge's Artemis Gallery Erie, CO 80516 ("Exceptional Antiquities, Asian, Ethnographic:") Thu, Jun 4, 2020 USA has also been selling parts of the Eldarir grandfather collection, this sale from June 04, 2020



Lot 3, Auction 6/4/2020: Egyptian Polychrome Gesso Coffin Lid - 1946 Provenance $80,925.00
Egypt, Late Dynastic Period, 26th to 31st Dynasty, ca. 664 to 332 BCE. An incredible exterior coffin lid carved from hardwood and depicting a serene countenance atop an elaborately decorated body. Painted gesso atop the lid is decorated to show the red-orange face with almond-shaped eyes and elongated canthi, a protruding nose above pouty lips, and a black chinstrap with a net-patterned false beard. Each wig lappet has vertical stripes of alternating hues with serrated tips, and a wadjet peers out on each shoulder. The huge wesekh collar is replete with checkerboards, blue and red triangles, rosettes, and drop-form patterns. The leg panels show the deceased laying atop a lion-headed table beneath the head of Anubis, flanked by the mourning goddesses Isis and Nephthys, with a sun disc, a winged scarab, and two wadjet eyes in the panel above, and two representations of the god Khnum to its sides. The lower legs display several standing funerary deities flanking three columns of hieroglyphs that perhaps identify the deceased.
Size: 74" L x 18" W (188 cm x 45.7 cm)
[some narrativisation ...] [...]
For a similar example of a coffin lid from the Thirtieth Dynasty with a lower portion beneath, please see Ikram, Salima and Aidan Dodson. "The Mummy in Ancient Egypt: Equipping the Dead for Eternity." Thames and Hudson, London, 1998, p. 241, fig. 324.
For another example of a coffin lid with dense decorations from the 26th Dynasty, please see The Metropolitan Museum of Art, accession number 30.3.44a,b.
For an example of a coffin lid showing the deceased praying to each of the funerary deities, please see The British Museum, museum number EA6693.
Included with the coffin lid is a custom-built display case/stand with a weighted base, mirrored bottom, and silica gel climate control with an integrated hydrometer in the back. The case is ready to accept a sheet acrylic cover and all cover mounting hardware is included, however the acrylic lid is not included with the display case/stand. The case can be taken to an acrylic fabricator to have a form-fitting cover created.
Condition: Loss to small area of lower corner as shown. Lid was cut into three large sections in the 1940s and rejoined by a museum conservator, with light in-fill material and overpainting along joint seams. Abrasions and nicks to gesso, with fading and chipping to pigmentation, and encrustations. Great remains of original painted gesso throughout.
Provenance: private Hawaii, USA collection; ex-private Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir collection, New York, USA, purchased in December, 1946 and imported from Egypt in November, 1948; ex-Salahaddin Sirmali collection, Egypt; appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian antiquities house
All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.
A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases
We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience.
#155996
At least it has not been sawn up, but only the lid made it to the market. And what happened to the human remains?

He'd also recently sold off (05 December 2018) a 'Huge Egyptian Late Period Wood & Gesso Sarcophagus Mask'. This one was wrenched off the coffin to make a saleable geegaw from it. "Provenance: private Honolulu, Hawaii, USA collection; ex-private New York, New York, USA collection, acquired by Mr. Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir in Egypt between 1946 and 1948"


And then we have some scrolls. Rare Egyptian Ptolemaic Papyrus Scrolls, Demotic Script Lot 2b being sold at the same time (June 4th 2020)
Egypt, Ptolemaic Period, ca. 332 to 30 BCE. A beautiful and extremely rare set of two tightly rolled papyrus scrolls. Each lengthy scroll is of a slender form, has open ends that reveal the interior layers, and displays several rows of illegible Demotic script written in black ink. For many centuries, papyrus was the most important writing material in the Classical and Mediterranean world, replacing clay tablets. The reeds used to make papyrus grow primarily in Egypt, and the Graeco-Roman world had to import them on a regular basis. Scrolls like these examples were typically manufactured in rolls up to 100 feet long and 7 to 15 inches wide. These scrolls bear wonderful evidence of the crisscrossing fibers that make up the papyrus. Size of largest: 0.875" W x 7.5" H (2.2 cm x 19 cm). [waffly narrativisation] [...] 
Provenance: private Hawaii, USA collection; ex-private Honolulu, Hawaii, USA collection; acquired by Mr. Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir in Egypt in 1929 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.
Rare Egyptian Ptolemaic Papyrus Scrolls (group of 3) Lot 2c has the same information.

Possibly the same collector was involved with this (not Eldarir) alabaster head, and this Ming pottery head.

"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection" : Isis and the Eldarir Grandfather Collection (April 3rd 2020)



Arte Primitivo 03/04/2020

# 618. Egyptian Large Terracotta Isis-Aphrodite
Estimate: $2,500-$3,500
Current High Bid: $2,000.00
Auction Closed(Final Price) $2,000.00
Category: Antiquities
Sub Category: Egypt - Roman-Egypt
Culture or Country: Egypt.
Period: Ca. 300-30 B.C.
Size: 16-1/4”H. x 4-1/4”W.
Description: Large molded terracotta figure of Isis-Aphrodite, holding her arms to her sides, wearing a polos. Original white slip surface with painted multicolor details. Long hairdo, braids descending down the front. Some normal scattered slip losses, repaired break across her left shoulder (repaired from two pieces) and head reattached, with break lines visible, feet reattached. Some loss to the hair braids and minor losses along the break lines. Repaired break through the hips, head repaired with scattered restoration. A nice example.
Provenance:
Private NYC collection, brought to USA in the 1940s, to present owner by descent. “It is on August 6th, 1929. We the honorable Salahaddin Sirmali...bey sold to the honorable Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir...bey A group of ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman antiquities. Authenticated and appraised by the ancient Egyptian expert and the head of the Egyptian antiquities house: Mr. Hossen Rashed. For the amount of two thousand Egyptian pounds: A group of the goddess Isis Aphrodite antiquities. Hellenisitic period, ten painted pottery statues of the goddess...plus a lime stone shrine...inside of it a pottery staute of the goddess Isis Aphrodite.”


"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Harlan Berk and a Wooden Shabti (April 1 2020)


Harlan Berk, a well-known US coin dealer (“The Art & Science of Numismatics”, North Clark Street, Chicago, IL. 60602 [" Dealers in ancient coins, U.S. andworld coins, antiquities, Bullion") also dabbles in selling antiquities, here's one from his "210th Buy or Bid Sale" April 1, 2020:
359. WOODEN USHABTI, New Kingdom, ca. 1567-1085 BC. A well preserved wooden ushabti standing mummiform with arms crossed over the body, wearing tripartite wig. Ex collection of Mr Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir; acquired 1946 from Salahaddin Sirmali, Cairo. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. H. 9” (23 cm)......................1950
This one has an odd patina on it (rather like one sees on modern made African masks from the Congo and adjacent areas that have been distressed to make them look old..).  It's not very nice. The modelling is a bit clumsy, no?

"The Elzadeer Taha Eldarir Collection": Christophe Bacher Resale Items, Figurine and Amulets (Some Sold before 2020)


Christoph Bacher Archäologie Ancient Art GmbH Gallery: Stubenring 1010 Wien. Another item from the dead grandfather collection.
Wooden Standing Figure of a Man
Culture: Egyptian
Period: Middle Kingdom, 2137-1781 B.C.
Material: Wood
Dimensions: 25 cm high
Price: Sold
Ref: 1116
Provenance: Private collection Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, acquired 1930 at Salahaddin Sirmali in Cairo. Brought to the USA before 1948 and since then in a New York private collection. Condition: The front of the base reattached, arms missing. Some wear.
Description: Standing figure of a man with a calf-length kilt. The face with large eyes, broad lips and broad nose (suggesting a dating to the 11th dynasty), as well as short black hair. He is wearing a hidden amulet (Khepri?) on his chest, the separately worked arms are missing. Original base, as well as intensive color remains are still preserved.
This is lot 397 of the 2016 Arte Primitivo sale

Bacher has had other items from this collection:
Two Diorite Poppy Bead Amulets
Culture: Egyptian Period: Late Period, 664-332 B.C.
Material: Diorite
Dimensions: each 1.7 cm long
Price: Sold
Ref: 1299
Provenance:
Collection Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, acquired on 15 May 1930 from Salahaddin Sirmali in Cairo and then brought to the USA.
Condition: Intact
Description: Two small diorite amulets in form of a cornflower with a broad flower head and jagged petals. The stem pierced for suspension. Since the New Kingdom cornflowers were worn as symbols for regeneration on necklaces or individually as an amulet.
and this Amulet of a Wadj Sceptre with a Lotus Flower
Culture: Egyptian Period: Late Period, 664-332 B.C. Material: Hematite Dimensions: 5.3 cm high Price: Reserved Ref: 1297
Provenance: Collection Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, acquired on 15 May 1930 from Salahaddin Sirmali in Cairo and then brought to the USA.
Condition: Except for some minor wear intact.
Description: Exceptional hematite amulet in form of a papyrus sceptre with a crowning lotus blossom. The amulet is tapering downwards. On the rectangular head a finely jagged lotus blossom. The back is flat. On the lower part of the blossom a lengthwise hole for suspension. The papurus stem stands for the word wadj – "to be green, to be young”. The holder of the amulet therefore hopes for everlasting youth. The lotus blossom served as the symbol for protection and sign for regeneration. Rare form.
and so on, the's got a lapis lazuli "heart amulet" (more twee narrativisation, and: "Provenance: Collection Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, acquired on 15 May 1930 from Salahaddin Sirmali in Cairo and then brought to the USA"). A haematite one, the same format and provenance and yet another one (getting a bit monotonous). Then a 'Rare Wadj Amulet with a Falcon Head' - another one bought on the 15th May...

Mr Bacher has some other items from this same man's collection, and this one seems to be unsold:
A Collection of 230 Faience Ushabtis Period: Late Period, 664-332 B.C. Material: Faience Dimensions: From 5 cm to 12 cm long Price: 28 000 Euro Ref: 1300 Provenance: Collection Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir, on 15 May 1930 from Salahaddin Sirmali in Cairo and then brought to the USA. Condition: Except for some abrasion and wear the ushabtis are throughout intact. Description: Important and large collection of 230 ushabtis of green and light blue faience, where the majority comes from the same grave complex. The figures depicted in mummiform, tripartite wig, false beard and with crossed arms. Most of them are holding the hoe in their left hand, in their right one the plough. Most of the hieroglyph inscription on the front.
If this is a 1930 purchase, how does the seller know these are from the same tomb?

"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection": "A Jar of Shabtis" (Dec 2nd 2019)


In December 2019 (sale 96) Arte Primitivo helped Mr Eldari sell off another part of his grandfather's collection:


"The Elzadeen Taha Eldarir Collection": Arte Primitivo Gallery sells some stuff from the Eldarir Grandfather Collection (Sept 16th 2019)


Arte Primitivo Gallery (Howard S. Rose - East 65th Street New York N.Y. 10065) September 16th 2019 sale has quite a lot specifically said to be from the collection of Ezeldeen Eldarir, or apparently from the same source, mixed in with other items:
461. Egyptian Carnelian and Lapis Corn Flower Necklace Egypt. 20-1/4”L. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. HossenRashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $6,000-$9,000 Closing: Tuesday, September 17th, 5:08 P.M


485. Mudbrick and Plaster Painted Fragment Egypt. New Kingdom. Private NYC collection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by descent. Est. $25,000-$35,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:14 A.M.
495. Openwork Lapis Uzat Eye Amulet Egypt. 1”H. x 1-1/2”W. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $2,000-$3,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:34 A.M.

496. Necklace with Uzats and Amulets Egypt. 13-1/2”L. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $1,200-$1,800 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:36 A.M.

498. Pair of Bronze Mummy Mask Eyes Egypt. 3”W. and 2-7/8”W. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house.Est. $1,000-$1,500 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:40 A.M.



499. Faience Ushabtis (228)Egypt. 2 to 4-1/2”H. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $15,000-$20,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:42 A.M.  [This lot is discussed further here

500. Mummy Mask with Inlaid Bronze Eyes Egypt. 10-3/4”H. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $2,000-$3,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:44 A.M

501. Egyptian White Face Mummy Masks (2)Egypt. 11”H. & 7-1/2”H. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $2,000-$3,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:46 A.M. 
502. Egyptian Mummy Mask Egypt. Late Period, ca. 700-30 B.C. 10-3/4”H. x 8”W. Private NYCcollection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by descent.Est. $2,000-$3,000Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:48 A.M.

503. Egyptian Mummy Mask Egypt. Late Period, ca. 700-30 B.C. 14-1/2”H. x 12”W. Private NY Ccollection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by descent.Est. $1,200-$1,800 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:50 A.M

504. Egyptian Bearded Mummy Mask Egypt. Late Period, ca. 700-30 B.C. 15-1/2”H. x 8-1/2”W. Private NYC collection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by descent. Est. $2,500-$3,500 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:52 A.M.

505. Group of Egyptian Amulets (50) Egypt. Late period. 1/2 to 2-1/2”H. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraisedby Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house.Est. $10,000-$15,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:54 A.M. [This lot is discussed further here]

506. Egyptian Faience Amulets (8) Egypt. Late period. 3/4 to 1-1/2”H. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house.Est. $1,200-$1,800 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 10:56 A.M  [This lot is discussed further here
511, 512 some dodgy-looking figurines
519. Egyptian Loose Mummy Beads Egypt. Late period, ca. 700-30 B.C. 700 grams. Private NY Ccollection, brought to USA prior to 1948, to present owner by descent.Est. $1,200-$1,800 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 11:22 A.M.

520. Egyptian Terracotta Jar and Loose Mummy Beads (100+)Egypt. Late period. 6-1/2”H. (jar), 1/16 to 1-3/8”L. (beads). Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $1,200-$1,800 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 11:24 A.M

521. Ptolemaic Limestone Stele of Ptolemy XII Egypt. Ptolemaic period 13”H. x 18”W. Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930.Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house. Est. $30,000-$50,000 Closing: Wednesday, September 18th, 11:26 A.M
The plastered mudbrick fragment does not look very convincing to me, and also has turned up on the market again.


"The Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir Collection" : Arte Primitivo and a Whole Lot of Amulets (18th Sept 2019)



Another lot of the Eldari grandfather collection, more amulets:
09/18/2019 Time Remaining: Closed
Lot# and Name:
505. Egyptian Group of 50 Amulets Estimate: $10,000-$15,000
Current High Bid: $3,000.00 Auction Closed(Final Price) $3,000.00
Category: Antiquities
Sub Category: Egypt - Late Period
Culture or Country: Egypt.
Period: Late period, ca. 700-30 B.C.
Size: 1/2” to 2-1/2”H.
Description: Large group of fifty carved stone amulets including, a set of four lapis Sons of Ra amulets, four different fly amulets, two cornflowers, a small three-piece lapis winged scarab, an orange carnelian hippo, ten different stone winged heart amulets, seven scarabs, including one with an inscription and a large lapis example. Three different Djed pillar amulets, three stone Girdle of Isis amulets, a black stone jackal headed column, two miniature votive head rests, and finally ten lotus column amulets. All are intact, overall exc. cond. A great grouping.
Provenance: Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house.
And here's some more of the little blighters... Arte Primitivo  506. Egyptian Faience Amulets (8) Estimate: $1,200-$1,800 Current High Bid: $425.00 Auction Closed 09/18/2019 (Final Price) $425.00

Group of eight pale blue-green glazed faience pottery amulets, including an Uzat eye, a nicely detailed Isis holding Horus amulet, A tauret hippo, a lotus flower column, two similar Ptah amulets and a ram headed example, and a baboon(?) amulet. All are intact, some light glaze wear. Provenance: Sold to Ezeldeen Taha Eldarir from Salahaddin Sirmali on 5/15/1930. Authenticated and appraised by Mr. Hossen Rashed, head of the Egyptian Antiquities house.
 
Creative Commons License
Ten utwór jest dostępny na licencji Creative Commons Uznanie autorstwa-Bez utworów zależnych 3.0 Unported.