Thursday, 25 June 2020

Playing about with Hammies


Some artefact hunters claim they "study the past" by ripping artefacts out of their archaeological context. Others just play games with them...:
Suffolk Detectorist @SDetectorist ·23 cue
#detectorist #metaldetecting #xpdeus #medievalhttps://twitter.com/SDetectorist/status/1275393355485233153 Too hot for me today so here's a coinage collage.


Suffolk Detectorist


Where were the finds labels while this was going on?




12 comments:

@Sdetectorist said...

I don't mind you using my image, would be nice if you asked first though, but not impressed with the tone of the blog.

"Where were the finds labels while this was going on?"

I record all my finds with my local PAS, infact I am a self recorder. I don't do this for the money, I still have everything I have found for 30 yrs. And where necessary reimburse the landowner. For me it is being outside, letting my mind wander away for life issues and enjoy finding out what was happening over the years on the land I detect on.

This was just a bit of fun to lighten the current world situation.

Paul Barford said...

but where were the finds labels? How do you curate these archaeological artefacts once you have found them? Trashing the archaeological record is a serious business, not "a bit of fun".

These objects must have cost you a bit in reimbursement with even to cheaper battered cut halfennies going for 15-30 quid each. So how much did the landowner get for each of the ones shown here?

The image is fair use.

Paul Barford said...

https://archaeologywassat.blogspot.com/2020/06/92-curation-storage-and-preservation-of.html

@Sdetectorist said...

Strange how finding objects in plough soil is trashing the archaeological record. Dosn't seem to count on any archaeological digs I see going on around here. That layer is just stripped away with huge machines so access can be made to undisturbed layers.

They live in coin trays, individually labelled. Linked to a database. Pick a coin and I'll give you PAS link. My landowner knows there worth but is happy for me to keep. I have just reimbursed him for 2 gold coins found on his land, he didn't want that either. I still gave it to him, to put in his childrens bank account.

Paul Barford said...

"Strange how finding objects in plough soil is trashing the archaeological record"
well it is isn't it? https://archaeologywassat.blogspot.com/2020/02/36-topsoil-assemblages.html
and section 6 starting from here: https://archaeologywassat.blogspot.com/2020/01/61-artefact-hunters-and-surface-sites.html

but when you've taken 48 individual items OUT of the "tray" with labels and arranged and rearranged them, how do you ensure the right one goes back in the right space? This seems a totaslly irresponsible way to treat and "preserve" archaeological information.

Brian Mattick said...

" I have just reimbursed him for 2 gold coins found on his land".

Reimbursed? You mean given him his property, surely?

Bit Freudian. Almost indicating you don't give him all his property. Is that legal?



@Sdetectorist said...

By drawing a plan, whilst i'm constructing it, Then replacing back in the drawers. Confirming with photographic records.

I record finds with GPS to a 10 figure NGR, including pottery and lithics, these are all recorded where necessary.

I have had no complaints from my FLO, infact have been commended on my record keeping.

I'm sorry I've offended you, and will say no more now.

Paul Barford said...

So, 48 x C.20 quid each is nearly a thousand pounds there. So what happens when you or somebody else sells your entire collection (when you go into a home or die or something), where does that 1000 quid go, and should not some of that go to the landowners that gave you these objects to "have fun with" for free? Are the names ofthe landowners traceable by your heirs from you collection's documentation? Do these landowners really know how much objects are worth on the open market?

Which part of Suffolk are you from?

Paul Barford said...

"Pick a coin and I'll give you PAS link". the brownish short cross left arm of the cross, 4th one in upper row. Let's see what the FLO made of that. Link please.

southwestpaw said...

Dear Paul,

Still no donation to a charity of your choice. Still not an apology for the offence you caused towards my 9 year old daughter.

I will not rest until this blog becomes digital archaeology and you roam Poland a free man - with more time and a better understanding of others.

Chin up.

Hougenai said...

'I have had no complaints from my FLO, infact have been commended on my record keeping'- Is no vindication at all. FLO's rarely criticise detectorists out of concern they will simply stop engaging. I have often wondered 'if a detectorist were to stand on a flo's toe, who would apologise?'

Paul Barford said...

"Still no donation to a charity of your choice. Still not an apology for the offence you caused towards my 9 year old daughter.

I will not rest until this blog becomes digital archaeology and you roam Poland a free man - with more time and a better understanding of others.

Chin up."

What my firm does for charity is between me and my accountant and certainly not your business. One wonders just what complexes "metal detectorists" have that they always have to strut around showing everybody they "give to charity" "as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, in order that they may be praised by people".

If your daughter uses the metal detector she has to hunt meteorites and gold nuggets only, then I apologise if it upset her that I made mention in a tweet of her using the metal detector you yourself told me she has for hunting for man-made items. OK?

As it happens, I am a free man, nobody's slave and a major intrusion onto my time is answering your fatuous trollish comments. Stick to the topic - here it is that an artefact hunter has made a collage of archaeological material. It does not seem so difficult to comment on that. And if you can't, go and find somebody else to try and pick a pointless fight with.

 
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