Saturday, 3 November 2012

US Customs Curb Import of "Thousands Upon Thousands" of Artefacts Without Export Documentation

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According to one commenator, when importing dugup artefacts for collection and sale at the moment:
"Americans face [...] requirements that preclude entry of  thousands upon thousands of cultural artifacts,"
they are called export licences, and if US Customs were not looking at the paperwork, we may infer that "thousands upon thousands of artefacts" without any kind of documentation of licit export would be passing onto the US market.  The writer of those words seems to think that US buyers want nothing better than to buy without a second thought smuggled and illicitly obtained dugup artefacts from other countries. Is that the case?

6 comments:

moneyjihad said...

"The writer of those words seems to think that US buyers want nothing better than to buy without a second thought smuggled and illicitly obtained dugup artefacts from other countries."

There is no indication in the post you linked to that the writer thinks American buyers want to purchase black market antiquities.

Paul Barford said...

Where in that post, where in that blog, where in that lobbyist's activities do you see ANY indication that he thinks collectors want access only to coins with proper export documentation?

The ACCG are fighting for the "freedom to collect" what, precisely, do you think? Define that in the terms of what the CCPIA which they oppose actually says and you have your answer.

Without the restriction, "thousands upon thousands" of dugup coins would be coming onto the US market which do not fit the definition of licit according to the applicable US law which is the 1983 CCPIA.

Mr Tompa presents the fact that these coins cannot come onto the US market as a "bad thing".

I say it is a good one.

How many of the estimated "50 000" US collectors of dugup coins will come onto this blog and say they agree with me do you think?

moneyjihad said...

The blogger recommended transferring, not eliminating, oversight to the Department of Commerce.

Paul Barford said...

The Department of Commerce is neither here nor there, suggest you try to understand what "the blogger" considers are "requirements that preclude entry of thousands upon thousands of cultural artifacts". That is laid down in the CCPIA not by this or that Federal Department. Mr Tompa and the nuimismatic trade bodies that pay him would like to see ancient dugup coins coins as exempt from such "requirements" (and presumably think that the Department of commerce would waive them in the interest of getting more American money into foreign hands).

Paul Barford said...

Do you collect coins or antiquities Mr Jihad? Is that your interest in this blog?

moneyjihad said...

Heh. No, I'm not a collector.

 
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